Interpreting My Test Results

Blood-Test

I recently viewed my most recent lab results on my health care website and wondered what the results meant. I could have called my doctor and found out what each test result meant but I didn’t want to be charged for my doctor’s time so I went online and found a website called Lab Tests Online which gives information about each test and what they diagnose or evaluate. Below are the results of some of the markers of my blood test and a couple of explanations about what each marker means. The results indicate that in all areas I am in the acceptable ranges. Hopefully if anything were way out of wack, I would have heard from my physician. I won’t bore you with the all of my results but it is good to know that if you want to have a clearer understanding of your health and what your test results mean it is easy to access online.

White Blood Cell Count  

My Result 7.0  Standard Range 4.16 – 9.95

The White blood cell count (WBC) is used as part of a full complete blood count (CBC)
screen for a wide range of diseases and conditions including diagnosing an infection or
inflammatory process. It helps to determine the presence of other diseases that affect
WBCs such as allergies, leukemia or immune disorders. It monitors the body’s response
to various treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy that are known to affect WBCs.

Red Blood Cell Count  

My Result 4.42  Standard Range 3.96 – 5.09

Red blood cells circulate in the blood and carry oxygen throughout the body. They are produced in the bone marrow and then released into the bloodstream as they mature. RBCs have a typical lifespan of about 120 days and are continuously renewed and replaced as they age and degrade or are lost through bleeding. A relatively stable number of RBCs is maintained in the circulation by increasing or decreasing the rate of production by the bone marrow.

Some conditions affect RBC production and may cause an increase or decrease in the number of mature RBCs released into the blood circulation. Other conditions may affect the lifespan of RBCs in circulation, especially if the RBCs are deformed due to an inherited or acquired defect or abnormality. If RBCs are lost or destroyed faster than they can be replaced, if bone marrow production is disrupted, or if the RBCs produced do not function normally, then a person will become anemic, which affects the amount of oxygen reaching tissues.

If too many RBCs are produced and released, then a person can develop polycythemia. This can cause decreased blood flow and related problems.

Hemoglobin  

My Result 12.6   Standard Range 11.6 – 15

The hemoglobin test may be used to screen for, diagnose, or monitor a number of conditions and diseases that affect red blood cells (RBCs) and/or the amount of hemoglobin in blood. It is often used with a hematocrit as a quick evaluation of the number of RBCs or is performed as part of a complete blood count (CBC) as an integral part of a health evaluation.

Hematocrit  

My Result 38.5%  Standard Range 34.9 – 45.2%

The hematocrit may be used to screen for, diagnose, or monitor a number of conditions and diseases that affect the proportion of the blood made up of red blood cells (RBCs). It is often used with a hemoglobin level as a simple and quick evaluation of RBCs or is performed as part of a complete blood count (CBC) as an integral part of a health evaluation.  This test screens for, diagnoses, and evaluates the severity of anemia and dehydration.

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